highcharts javascript libraries

You are here

Percentage of Office-Based Physicians Who Have Adopted Electronic Health Records

The use of electronic health records can reduce paperwork and administrative burdens, reduce medical errors and improve the quality and value of health care.

Metrics Calculation:

This measure presents information on the percentage of physicians overall, and primary care physicians in particular, who have adopted electronic health records at the basic and fully functional levels.

Additional Information:

From 2007 through 2009, basic systems are defined as having all of the following computerized functionalities: Patient demographics, patient problem lists, physician clinical notes, computerized orders for prescriptions, viewing lab results, and viewing imaging results. Basic systems in 2010 and 2011 included additional features: “medication list” for 2010 and “medications and allergies list” for 2011. The 2007 data are from the in-person National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS). The 2008-2010 data are from the combined files (in-person NAMCS and Electronic Medical Record mail survey). The 2011 data are based only on the mail survey. From 2007 through 2009, whether or not physicians had a basic system was unknown for up to 8% of physicians nationally; these physicians were treated as not having basic systems. In 2010 and 2011, whether or not physicians had a basic system was unknown for about 4% of physicians nationally; these physicians were treated as not having basic systems. Status of fully functional system was unknown for about 5% of physicians nationally; these physicians were treated as not having fully functional systems.

Inclusion Criteria -- overall: Nonfederal physicians classified as providing direct patient care in office-based practices.

Exclusion Criteria -- overall: Physicians in the specialties of radiology, anesthesiology, and pathology are excluded from NAMCS.

Inclusion Criteria - primary care: Physicians were in the specialties of internal medicine, family or general practice, general pediatrics, and general obstetrics and gynecology.

Exclusion Criteria - primary care: Mid-level providers in community health centers in the NAMCS sample were excluded from this analysis. More details about NAMCS survey design and methods are available at: www.cdc.gov/nchs/ahcd/ahcd_questionnaires.htm This measure is calculated by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey.

Fully functional systems are defined as having all of the computerized functionalities in basic systems plus the following: drug interaction or contraindication warning, prescription sent to pharmacy electronically, computerized orders for lab tests, test orders sent electronically, out of range values highlighted, computerized orders for radiology tests, and guideline-based interventions or screening tests. Practice size is defined as the number of physicians, including the sample physician, at the practice location where most patients are seen. All physicians included in this analysis were sampled as part of the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS) Electronic Medical Records Supplement, conducted by mail in 2010. From 2007 through 2009, whether or not physicians had a basic system was unknown for up to 8% of physicians nationally; these physicians were treated as not having basic systems. In 2010, whether or not physicians had a basic system was unknown for about 6% of physicians nationally; these physicians were treated as not having basic systems. Status of fully functional system was unknown for about 8% of physicians nationally; these physicians were treated as not having fully functional systems. Inclusion Criteria -- overall: Nonfederal physicians classified as providing direct patient care in office-based practices. Exclusion Criteria -- overall: Physicians in the specialties of radiology, anesthesiology, and pathology are excluded from NAMCS.

Inclusion Criteria, primary care: Physicians were in the specialties of internal medicine, family or general practice, general pediatrics, and general obstetrics and gynecology.

Exclusion Criteria, primary care: Mid-level providers in community health centers in the NAMCS sample were excluded from this analysis.

More details about NAMCS survey design and methods are available at: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/ahcd/ahcd_questionnaires.htm

This measure is calculated by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey.

Metropolitan Status

Percentage of Office-Based Physicians Who Have Adopted Electronic Health Records by Metropolitan Status



Download these data »      Explore these data »



National Summary

Percentage of Office-Based Physicians Who Have Adopted Electronic Health Records by National Summary



Download these data »      Explore these data »



Overall-State

Percentage of Office-Based Physicians Who Have Adopted Electronic Health Records by Overall-State



Download these data »      Explore these data »

Practice Size

Percentage of Office-Based Physicians Who Have Adopted Electronic Health Records by Practice Size



Download these data »      Explore these data »



Provider Specialty

Percentage of Office-Based Physicians Who Have Adopted Electronic Health Records by Provider Specialty



Download these data »      Explore these data »



Region

Percentage of Office-Based Physicians Who Have Adopted Electronic Health Records by Region



Download these data »      Explore these data »